0

The Breakfast at Tiffany’s Date – visit New York

The Breakfast at Tiffany’s date

This is a good weekend afternoon date. Get the popcorn ready, get comfy and snuggle up to watch Breakfast at Tiffany’s. It’s a classic romantic New York movie with George Peppard and the timeless, inimitable Audrey Hepburn. It is loosely based on the Truman Capote novel of the same name and is also a bit of a New York time capsule, having come out in 1961. Directed by Blake Edwards, it won Henry Mancini two Academy Awards for Best Musical Score and Best Original Song (Moon River). Healso garnered a Grammy Award for Best Soundtrack Album. Mrs. Hepburn was nominated for an Oscar for Best Actress in a Leading Role for her memorable role as the naïve, eccentric Holly Golightly.

Now for some fun. How about taking a stroll past Holly Golightly’s Upper East Side apartment and then shooting straight to Tiffany’s to have something engraved, just like Holly and Paul did in the movie? How awesome is that? The green-and-white candy-striped awning at 169 East 71st Street (between 3rd Ave and Lexington Ave) may be gone but you’ll still recognize the white limestone-colored townhouse (adjacent to the left of the brownstone). A nice walk would be to start at Park Avenue and 71stStreet and walk to 3rd Avenue, stopping a moment to gaze at that location where such a warm and touching (and often funny) love story took place.To continue your walk, make a left on 3rd Avenue and walk up to 78thStreet. Make a left on 78th Street. This four-block stretch is one of the most beautiful blocks in the city. Notice all the beautiful townhouses and brownstones, the different types of architecture, the abundance of trees overhanging the street. From Park Ave and 71st St to 3rd Ave to 78th St to 5thAve is about a 25 minute walk so make sure you pick a day when the weather is nice. This is a great stroll through a beautiful neighborhood.

 

When you get to 5th Avenue and 78th Street there’s a good chance you won’t want to walk another 20 minutes to Tiffany’s on the corner of 5thAvenue and 57th Street so just go ahead and hail a taxi for a quick ride (hopefully, if the traffic on 5th Ave isn’t too bad). Tiffany’s will be on the far left corner. Now remember in the movie when Paul, a struggling writer with no money, asked the man behind the counter to engrave something for Holly? He bought something inexpensive ($10 I think it was) andmade this romantic gesture to Holly. Go ahead and do the same thing! Hopeless romantics will love this. Of course you will probably not find anything for $10 but let’s have some fun with the counterperson and ask them if they’ve ever seen Breakfast at Tiffany’s and if they remember that scene when Paul and Holly were in the store. If not, go ahead and explain it to him or her. No doubt they will try to be as helpful as possible. Who can resist such unbridled romance as this!

 

The Essentials:

Holly Golightly’s apartment, 169 East 71st Street between Lexington and 3rd Avenues in the Upper East Side neighborhood of Manhattan.

Tiffany’s, 727 5th Avenue at 57th Street. Tel: (212)755-8000.www.tiffany.com.

 

Some interesting notes:

Author Truman Capote originally chose Marilyn Monroe to play the lead role but ultimately Paramount Pictures had the final saying and decided to go with Audrey Hepburn. Inside Tiffany’s along the wall to the left when you enter you’ll find the Tiffany diamond. It’s a 128.5 karat yellow diamond with 90 facets. It’s considered priceless. Only two women ever wore this diamond: Mrs. Mary Whitehouse and Audrey Hepburn during publicity photo shoots for Breakfast at Tiffany’s.

 

0

A date in Brooklyn – Visit New York with Romancing Manhattan Tours

A visit to the New York Transit Museum in Brooklyn and an early romantic dinner at Saul (Carroll Gardens, Brooklyn) followed by drinks at Clover Club (Carroll Gardens, Brooklyn)

 What an overlooked gem! If the massiveness of New York City’s subway and transportation system intrigues you, then you will love this little, often overlooked museum. The New York Transit Museum, one of the city’s leading cultural institutions is the largest museum in the United States devoted to urban public transportation history, and one of the premier institutions of its kind in the world. The Museum explores the development of the greater New York Metropolitan region through the presentations of exhibitions, tours, educational programs, and workshops dealing with the cultural, social, and technological history of public transportation. Since it’s inception over a quarter century ago, the Museum, housed in a historic 1936 IND subway station in Brooklyn Heights, has grown in scope and popularity.

The museum’s galleries feature curious and engaging exhibits such as Steel, Stone, and Backbone, which recounts the tale of building New York City’s 100 year-old subway system, and many highly interactive exhibitions such as On The Streets, an in-depth look at New York City’s trolleys and buses.

Since this museum closes at 4pm, you’ll want to get there sometime between 2:30 – 3pm so you don’t have too much time between the museum and the dinner. Allow a good hour to visit this museum.

Tip: Be sure to sneak a kiss or two on one of their vintage subway cars, just like they did in the old days.

After the museum, it’s just a 15 minute walk to your restaurant (see below for easy walking directions). If you have some time to kill before your dinner there are plenty of shops along Smith Street to peruse. Saul is a pioneer in this ever-so-popular hot neighborhood. It’s casual and intimate with an American menu. Their menu changes seasonally so expect nothing but the best and freshest ingredients. Be sure to check out their menu online (see website below). This restaurant does get crowded – and noisy – so be sure to make a reservation just to be safe. For a fun end to a meal you must try their signature Baked Alaska!

 

Tip: ask for table 5A, it’s a corner table.

Walking directions: When exiting the museum turn right on Boerum Place and walk down to Atlantic Avenue. Turn left on Atlantic Avenue and go just one block over to Smith Street. Turn right onto Smith Street and the restaurant will be 2 and a half blocks down on your right (between Dean and Bergen Streets).

For a perfect end to your date, all you have to do is walk four and a half blocks down Smith Street (against the flow of traffic) to Clover Club (Smith Street between Baltic and Butler Streets). The Clover Club is based on an actual club that existed in Philadelphia between 1882 and the 1920s, so the drink menu and atmosphere are reflective of that time period. The bartenders here are extraordinary (mixologists) and the cocktails are sure to impress.  But if you really want to make an impression, order off the menu and ask for the Kick Flip (just trust me on this one, it’s delicious…. and potent!)

Tip: There’s live Big Band jazz on Wednesdays between 8:30pm and 11:30pm. They get very crowded on Wednesday’s so call ahead to reserve a table (there’s no cover charge).

 

The Essentials:

New York Transit Museum, 130 Livington Street in Brooklyn Heights, Brooklyn. Tel: (718)694-1600. Admission: $7 for adults. www.mta.info/mta/museum/ Hours: Tues – Fri, 10am – 4pm; Sat and Sun, 11am – 5pm. CLOSED MONDAYS.

Saul, 140 Smith Street between Dean and Bergen Streets. Tel: (718)935-9844. www.saulrestaurant.com

Clover Club, 210 Smith Street between Baltic and Butler Streets, Carroll Gardens, Brooklyn. Tel: (718)855-7939. www.cloverclubny.com/

 

Some interesting notes:

New York City has the largest subway system in the world with over 700 miles of tracks and 468 subway stations. It was built in 1904 and transports well over a billion people a year.